12/03/2015

Put aside any prophecy of doom. Let’s talk about something that could be used as a resilience-enhancing strategy. Something that could help to prevent people from being forced to move later on. Something that  does not exclusively belong to our time and has always taken place in the past; a topic that lies in the area of collaboration between climate science and policy. To learn  more about climate induced migrations, we asked Koko Warner some questions. Academic at the United Nations University, where she leads a research department on climate resilient society at the Institute for Environment and Human Security in Bonn (Germany), and lead author of  the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) on adaptation, Dr. Koko Warner is considered one of the most active and influential women in the international debate on climate change. “All regions and countries are affected without exceptions – she explains to Laura Cagliagli while addressing the complexity of the climate induced migrations topic – “Today, the overlapping effects of a constant increasing global population, different political and government assets, and the impacts and implications of climate change have caused new issues and challenges related to human migrations.”

Read the full interview  on Climate Science & Policy, the free digital magazine edited by CMCC.

 (Picture: “A smile for the press” murales – Lampedusa harbour, CC by Marco Molino @flickr.com)